June 29 – Sunday

Today was our first Sunday in our new ward Lille.  Bishop Duez said that it is a good thing that we are only here for 6 weeks, because after 8 weeks, he’d give us a calling.  Because of my limited French, I think I’d only be good in the Nursery, and maybe not even that.
Church was wonderful.  The missionaries were our translators and we met a couple visiting from Arizona.  I met a man who has found 200,000 names and he picked up some codes of my ancestors and that night wrote me to tell me that he found a death date for Stanislas’ wife, Antoinette and confirmed that she was born in Paris.  I think I may have a break through on that line now.  Now if I can just find Stanislas’ death date, but that will definitely be a mystery. 
The Bishop told Bradford that he will take care of our family while he is away and told him that he hopes Bradford can return to pick us up.  That would be so much money, and probably not worth it, but it sure would be nice.  I think Bradford has fallen in love with Lille as much as I have.  When the Bishop announced us in Church he said, “Sister Pack’s family is from here, so they are coming home.”  And I really do feel like that is the case.

After Church, I decided to take advantage of the wifi since it isn’t working at my house. While working on stuff, a man who spoke perfect English and was dressed very nice approached us and asked us why we were in Lille.  I told him a bit of my story and he kept pressing for more information.  I ended up telling him my whole story.  He then leaned in close to me, looked me in the eye and took my hand, “Your sacred duty is to learn to speak French.”  This was the first person to suggest I learn the language.  I told him that I knew that was true.  He said he looked forward to talking to me again.  I told him that I looked forward to talking to him again in French.   I later found out that he is a general authority in the 3rd quorum.

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